A collection of what will be, what could be, and what could have been.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

1027 Wilshire was a residential tower that was proposed in 2006 and was set to be built in Downtown Los Angeles by 2010.The project was unfortunately later cancelled due to financial difficulties.  

Had it been approved, it would have been 185 metres (607 feet) tall making it the 14th tallest building in Los Angeles.  The location that would have housed 1027 Wilshire will remain a parking lot for the time being.

 Wilshire Grand is a supertall skyscraper that has been approved for Downtown Los Angeles.  The 340 metre (1,100 foot) tower will feature a combination of office, hotel, and retail space.  

The original Wilshire Grand Hotel, which sits on the site of the future skyscraper is currently being deconstructed.

Upon completion in 2017, Wilshire Grand will be the tallest building building in Los Angeles and the tallest building west of the Mississippi River. 

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X-Seed 4000 is the tallest building ever designed. If ever built it would be around 4,000 m (13,000 ft) tall (half the size of Mt. Everest) .  Do to the building’s monumental height, actually constructing it would be impossible.  The building would be able to hold about 1 million occupants and would cost $1 Trillion to actually build. 

Reblogged from transitmaps  55 notes
transitmaps:

Historical Map: Plans for New York Subway Expansion, 1920
I found out about this awesome map from a tweet from Vanshnookenraggen (otherwise known as Andrew Lynch) just the other day.
Originally, I was just going to post the black and white map from the 1920 New York Times article that the original blog post references, but then I realised that the image on the blog linked to a super high resolution PDF of the map. As I found the map in the newspaper article a bit difficult to decipher (lots and lots of intersecting black lines!), I decided to colour it up in Photoshop myself, just to make everything a bit easier to see and understand.
Not everything is perfect: the source material looks like it’s been (understandably) scanned from an actual copy of the newspaper, so a lot of finer detail has been lost. It looks like some of the proposed lines are actually improvements of the existing track and really should be a thick red line superimposed on a thin black line (look closely, and you can see that some red dashed lines are joined together by a thinner line). However, especially in the tangled web of downtown Manhattan, I really couldn’t make things out, so all thicker lines are red.
The map itself details the almost outrageous plans for expansion that the New York Subway had way back in 1920 — everything you see in red was planned to be built in the next twenty-five years (by 1945!). Of course, not everything seen here has come to fruition, but you can’t accuse the planners of not thinking big!
Head on over to Flickr to look at the map in high resolution — and let me know what you think of my handiwork!
(Source: Cameron Booth/Flickr via @vanshnook)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Plans for New York Subway Expansion, 1920

I found out about this awesome map from a tweet from Vanshnookenraggen (otherwise known as Andrew Lynch) just the other day.

Originally, I was just going to post the black and white map from the 1920 New York Times article that the original blog post references, but then I realised that the image on the blog linked to a super high resolution PDF of the map. As I found the map in the newspaper article a bit difficult to decipher (lots and lots of intersecting black lines!), I decided to colour it up in Photoshop myself, just to make everything a bit easier to see and understand.

Not everything is perfect: the source material looks like it’s been (understandably) scanned from an actual copy of the newspaper, so a lot of finer detail has been lost. It looks like some of the proposed lines are actually improvements of the existing track and really should be a thick red line superimposed on a thin black line (look closely, and you can see that some red dashed lines are joined together by a thinner line). However, especially in the tangled web of downtown Manhattan, I really couldn’t make things out, so all thicker lines are red.

The map itself details the almost outrageous plans for expansion that the New York Subway had way back in 1920 — everything you see in red was planned to be built in the next twenty-five years (by 1945!). Of course, not everything seen here has come to fruition, but you can’t accuse the planners of not thinking big!

Head on over to Flickr to look at the map in high resolution — and let me know what you think of my handiwork!

(Source: Cameron Booth/Flickr via @vanshnook)

755 Figueroa Street is a proposed commercial skyscraper from 2006 that was to go up in Downtown Los Angeles.  Once completed the tower would stand at about 214 metres (702 feet).  As of this moment it seems as though the project is dead in the water due to lack of construction at the sight and lack of information from Richard Keating Architecture, the developers of the building.  

 

Thank you for running this blog whoever does. I knew California had a deep history, but I'm always surprised about these little known facts you find.

Thank you, I’m really glad to hear that you like it :D!!! I’ll be sure to include more California related post in the near future!

The proposed State of Jefferson was first conceived after third US President Thomas Jefferson sent explorers Lewis and Clarke to map out the area in 1803.  The state would comprise of the southern portion of Oregon and the Northern portion of California.

For a while in the 1940s it really did seem as thought Jefferson would become it’s own independent State, however the movement was later killed when Pearl Harbour was bombed by the Japanese on 7 December, 1941.